How much do you know? Take the UNICEF Canada HIV/AIDS Quiz


How much do you know? Take the UNICEF Canada HIV/AIDS Quiz

1. AIDS is the leading cause of death worldwide for people ages 15 to 49.
True
False

2. In many countries, HIV infection rates are much higher among teenage girls than teenage boys.
True
False

3. 1,700 infants became HIV-positive every day last year either during pregnancy, birth, or through breast feeding.
True
False

4. Sexual activity is the main route of HIV transmission in all parts of the world.
True
False

5. HIV/AIDS negatively impacts children’s rights
True
False

6. Five out of ten children in the world living with HIV/AIDS are African
True
False

7. Armed conflict increases the likelihood of HIV infection
True
False

8. All young people can access information on HIV/AIDS prevention at school.
True
False

9. Stigma and discrimination are the biggest barriers to testing, treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS.
True
False

10. Fourteen million children have been orphaned by AIDS worldwide.
True
False

Answers

Question 1: True
Only a fraction of the world’s 1 billion young people are aware of the risks they face or have the knowledge or life skills they need to protect themselves from infection. Even young people who know all the ways to prevent infection may be unable to prevent infection because of poverty, sexual violence, or the absence of youth-friendly health services.

Question 2: True
Girls are getting infected faster, and they are getting infected earlier. Girls are physically more vulnerable to infection, but sexual violence and deep-rooted gender-based discrimination compound their risks.

Question 3: True
Infants are more vulnerable to HIV infection because of their un-formed immune system. Infants get sick faster, and their infections are more frequent, severe, and harder to cure. More than two thirds of infants infected with HIV die before they are five years old.

Question 4: False
In Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia, new HIV infections occur mainly among injecting drug users.

Question 5: True
HIV/AIDS is much more than just a disease. It prevents children and youth all over the world from enjoying their rights to life, food, health, education, an adequate standard of living, and protection from abuse and exploitation.

Question 6: False
Sub-Saharan Africa has been the region hardest hit by HIV/AIDS. In fact, it is home to 9 out of 10 children in the world living with HIV/AIDS.

Question 7: True
Many countries plagued by conflict also have serious HIV/AIDS epidemics. In fact, 13 of the 17 countries with over 100,000 children orphaned by AIDS are either in conflict or on the brink of emergency. Armed conflict creates and aggravates the conditions – and the human rights abuses – that make people particularly vulnerable to HIV/AIDS.

Question 8: False
Young people most vulnerable to HIV/AIDS (ie: street children, child labourers and sex workers) – are also the most difficult to reach because they are not in school. These young people are more likely to be ignored and ostracized than helped.

Question 9: True
Stigma and discrimination against those with HIV/AIDS is the reason why people infected with the disease often don’t seek testing and treatment. This explains in part why, in some countries, up to 90 per cent of people who are HIV-positive don’t know their status and may be unintentionally spreading the disease.

Question 10: True
One of the most devastating aspects of the HIV/AIDS epidemic is the growing proportion of children the disease has orphaned. Unlike most diseases, HIV/AIDS generally kills not just one, but both parents. Children orphaned by AIDS often face malnutrition, illness, physical and psychosocial trauma, impaired cognitive and emotional development, violence, discrimination and exploitation.

UNICEF Canada HIV/AIDS Education Centre

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