United Church of Canada Moderator to receive Craig Chaplin Memorial Award


Three Colleges – The United Theological College, The Montreal Diocesan Theological College and The Presbyterian College, Montreal – are gathering May 7 to celebrate their respective Convocations and 100 years together as the Montreal School of Theology.

The Right Reverend Dr. Gary Paterson, Moderator of the United Church of Canada, will be an honoured guest of United Theological College as recipient of the Craig Chaplin Memorial Award, named for my brother who died in May, 2007.

Craig’s loved ones marvel that his Award, to honour the achievements, projects and ministries of openly LGBTQI persons, will be going to the spiritual leader of the Church less than a generation after the historic approval of LGBT ordination in the United Church of Canada. How thrilled Craig would be!

In a letter to UTC Principal Philip Joudrey, confirming the terms of reference for the Award, Craig wrote:

“…it is my intention and desire that this award be presented in recognition of the particular ministries of (LGBT) people both within the formal, organized structures of the Christian Church and without…choosing to honour those whose life’s work has been particularly distinguished in its clear embodiment of such central Gospel values as personal courage and integrity, life-affirming faith and spirituality, an unswerving commitment to social justice and a sustainable environment, and solidarity with those who are poor or marginalized.”

Additional Convocation honours will be bestowed by the other participating colleges and the Convocation Address will be delivered by renowned United Church of Canada theologian Douglas Hall.

To be held at the Church of St. Andrew and St. Paul, on the edge of the McGill University neighbourhood, this will be the first joint Convocation of the three Colleges – and marking 100 years of The Montreal School of Theology is an occasion for a grand celebration!

Shaun Fryday, whose faith community emulates his personal hospitality, to be the 2013 recipient of the Craig Chaplin Memorial Award


Rev Shaun Fryday has been selected by Montreal’s United Theological College to receive the award, established by my late brother, at the UTC Convocation on May 8th, 2013. Fittingly, the ceremonies will take place in Shaun’s congregation of Beaconsfield United Church. When he received the news, Shaun is said to have been deeply moved, recalling Craig as one of his closest friends and how the award makes Craig seem “very present”. Craig died on May 9, 2007 as the result of a fall fifteen days earlier which caused traumatic brain injuries. Like me, he had been retired since the mid-1990s when the stress and fatigue of living with HIV had become too much to bear in his capacity as a United Church minister in west-end Montreal. It was shortly thereafter that he first made plans to establish the award, which would follow his death.

In a letter to the college, in which he outlined terms of reference for the award, Craig wrote:

“…it is my intention and desire that this award be presented in recognition of the particular ministries of gay and lesbian people both within the formal, organized structures of the Christian Church and without…to honour those whose life’s work has been particularly distinguished in its clear embodiment of such central Gospel values as personal courage and integrity, life-affirming faith and spirituality, an unswerving commitment to social justice and a sustainable environment and solidarity with those who are poor or marginalized. “The conditions of eligibility for potential recipients of this award are intentionally and necessarily exclusive in one important respect – the person being honoured must be able and willing to be publicly recognized as a lesbian or gay man. I am sadly aware of the fact that because of the current climate within some churches and certain elements of our society, this condition effectively excludes a good many competent and highly gifted people who are eminently deserving but who do not feel they can risk coming out of the closet at this time. I am all too aware of the oppression many of them suffer and the peculiar irony in the fact that I am creating an award for which I myself would not have been eligible for most of my professional career in the Church because of my own inability during those years to be safely and publicly self-declared as a gay man.”

Craig went on to say that he believed the award would have the potential to create positive, visible role models for gay and lesbian Christians. He poignantly recalled the United Church’s much-debated decision in 1988 to no longer exclude LGBT persons from consideration as ministers. The final decision was made at a Church-wide council meeting in Victoria, which Craig attended with much trepidation, referring to LGBT members in the third person. Much has, thankfully, changed since then – the Church evenly electing an openly gay man as Moderator last August! In nominating Shaun, his congregation cited his vision and commitment to numerous social justice initiatives, from guiding the parish in becoming an LGBT-affirming congregation to the creation two years ago of an LGBTQ Youth Centre, a first for Montreal’s West Island (and for any church!). The centre has more recently expanded its outreach to family members of the LGBTQ community as well as to LGBT adults seeking to break out of isolation. A couple of paragraphs from a congregation member’s supporting letter speak volumes:

“…after working at the front lines of the African AIDS epidemic I needed solace and community…Shaun was not only open about his sexuality, he was willing to explore the injustices the world visited on LGBTQ people and explore how the experience of being ‘different’ in the world might offer us all opportunity to live more compassionately and justly… “But I also would like to make clear that Reverend Fryday does not confine his zeal for social justice in ministry merely to issues directly impacting the LGBTQ population and their families. He has been a fierce advocate for the indigenous people of the Philippines, and has determinedly brought their plight into our consciousness at Beaconsfield United Church. Indigenous communities in far away places are easy communities for comfortable Canadians to ignore. But Reverend Fryday has demonstrated that to do so is merely to perpetuate the systems of inequality that plague our planet, destroy communities and, ultimately, our planet. And when injustices on this scale occur, we cannot be silent.”

Shaun’s c.v. concludes, “I have a number of leisure activities that I enjoy pursuing. Particularly, I am an avid reader, I enjoy writing, and I love to cook (and eat!)” Shaun is a tall, and in other ways, large man – self-deprecating, too! His hospitality figured prominently in the agonizing days that Craig lay dying in Montreal’s Neurological Institute. Craig’s partner, Claude, and sister Lynn kept constant vigil each day asking other would-be visitors (other than we siblings) to respect their privacy. With understanding and compassion illustrative of his pastoral care, Shaun prepared and delivered delicious home-cooked meals a considerable distance each day to the walk-up Craig and Claude shared in the “Le Plateau” district. I was privileged to partake in some of these meals, both in Montreal and Perth (those we took up there for Craig’s burial). Craig’s family is proud to anticipate Shaun receiving this award!

I’m sure that Craig would be proud of his United Church of Canada electing a gay man as Moderator


The criteria my brother Craig set out for the United Theological College award in his name reads in part:

To recognize the powerful and passionate ministries of gay and lesbian persons and to honour one whose life’s work has been particularly distinguished in its clear commitment to such central Gospel values as personal courage and integrity, life-affirming faith and spirituality, an unswerving commitment to social justice, a sustainable environment and solidarity with those who are poor or marginalized.

Now I’m not making an early pitch for next year’s award but I can imagine that Craig would be pleased and proud of the United Church General Council’s choice of openly gay Rev. Dr. Gary Paterson as Moderator for the next three years. In fact, he was one of three openly gay candidates in a record field of fifteen nominees.

Craig was not completely open with his sexuality right up until he took his early retirement, at which time, it turned out, his parishioners were far more concerned for his health and well-being than his sexual orientation. He had been able to come out to many people in his congregation over the years when he thought it would be helpful but I know he took something of an envious delight in me being as open as I have been for so long.

The United Church of Canada broke new ground, and cracked open parched, dusty ground, when in 1988 – twenty-four years ago – its General Council decided, by no means unanimously, that every Christian, regardless of sexual orientation, was not only welcome in the church but was “eligible to be considered for ordered ministry.”

Craig was at that assembly in 1988, speaking of sexual orientation in the third person, feeling the slings and arrows of the often acrimonious debate. In light of all the love which surrounded us when he died, and the wonderful memories of Craig his parishioners shared, it is still so painful to imagine what that meeting in Victoria must have been like for him and other lgbt colleagues.

That was then. This is now. Although my direct relationship with the United Church has never been the same since Craig’s death, I applaud the decision-makers who re-affirmed the church’s 1988 decision in such a big way.

Craig`s timing


When Craig died five years ago today he could not have ordained that his memory would loom large during this week each year as the award in his name is presented at today`s Convocation ceremonies of United Theological College.

He would not have chosen, for Mom`s sake at least, to die so close to his birthday, either, this Sunday – yes, Mother`s Day, just like it was in 2007.

But it is what it is.

Skies are considerably brighter in Montréal today.

While the sting of the first few years of grief has lessened considerably, this is one of those days when missing Craig is quite a bit more intense.

Not pictured


I am mindful, on this Father’s Day, that I do not have many photographs of Thomas Arnold (“Arnie”) Chaplin.  (The additional ones I do have are wedding party shots with people who might not wish to be published.)  However my memory informs me of many more, in safe-keeping with Mom, from the honeymoon phase, the beginnings of our family, and so on – and more of them in colour!  However, due to the limitations of our cameras of that time (not to mention the cruelty of those large adhesive photo album pages of the 1970s) some colours have faded or been peeled off entirely.  I hope to, however, do my level best to increase my scanned, uploaded collection in future visits with Mom.

The four pictures up top are of Dad on his wagon in Glen Tay, Bathurst Township, Lanark County, Ontario (just west of the Town of Perth), followed by Dad holding my sister Lynn (and a wide-eyed Craig on his right), Dad (at my sister’s age in the previous photo) held in the arms of my grandmother on the farm with older members of his family, and in the fourth picture I am in Dad’s right arm, Lynn in his left, and Craig with the obviously rosy-cheeked grin on the right.

Not pictured is the devoted, hard-working guy I grew up with whose daily routine was almost like clockwork.

He was the first up in the morning (7:10) and, therefore, the first to use our bathroom – so tiny by today’s standards with exactly enough room for a toilet, sink and tub.  Before I was of school age I remember standing on the toilet watching him shave in the mirror.  By 7:25 or so he was eating breakfast with the rest of us in a kitchen-dinette which, again, used every inch of space optimally.  At 7:50 Dad was at the car-port door with Mom, a wet-sounding peck was exchanged along with the daily farewell, “Toodle-oo”  (No wonder spell-check has trouble with that.)  I don’t know how that word entered their vernacular – I must remember to ask Mom.

Dad was fortunate to live about ten or fifteen minutes from work and, as a result, he never failed to drive home at lunch.  This was great when I was in elementary school since we also came home for lunch.  After he ate he laid down on the sofa where, without napping, he managed to have a rest that most working nowadays, and many then, would envy.

At 12:50 Mom and Dad repeated their morning good-bye ritual and Dad was gone until about 5:10 when his 1959 Ford Fairlane, 1968 Buick Special or 1973 Impala drove up the slight incline of our driveway.

Not pictured is the father who, without the perks of a company dental plan, managed to pay for trips to Montreal for Craig and me for braces, in Craig’s case, and then braces – and a whole lot more – for me when I smashed my mouth on the cement foundation of school playground equipment.  (Mom’s income as a piano teacher helped, too, I know.)  Together they also put all four kids through university or college.

Not pictured is the Dad who – together with Mom – calmly accepted, with no outward signs of difficulty, both his sons disclosing that we were gay (four years apart, just like our ages) AND, no more than ten years later, that we were HIV-positive.

‘Unconditional love is what we have to offer,’

says (Dad), looking surprised there could be any alternative.”

Dad (quoted above) took part with Mom in a magazine article, which I am too-generously credited with having co-written, for The United Church Observer in May of 1996.  That would be courageous even now, more than fifteen years later, but they’ve always brushed aside any sentiments of courage when it comes to the complete acceptance of their kids.  (Mom still can’t believe the ever-changing varieties of parents’ rejection of their children.)

Not pictured, indeed, is Dad’s very best friend for well over fifty years who continues to bless us just by being herself.

Not pictured, finally, is my Dad who lived only long enough to see his first grandchild reach eight months old.  He had suffered a slight, non-debilitating stroke and so it was really important as a family to gather in celebration of his seventy-fifth birthday on April 1, 2002.  Just a month later, May 4, 2002, he collapsed and died in the garden he so loved (and he kept one wherever we lived).

I picture Dad, alive and vibrant, on the back step with a handful of onions, leaf lettuce or beets or a couple of Mom’s favourite yellow roses.  But mostly I picture him in his garden.

An historic church building lives into the future with the past


photo Massicotte et Dignard architectes Crédit-photo: Massicotte et Dignard

Une traduction ( +/- ) suit.

That glass atrium between the church on the left and the social hall on the right was, until renovations began, an empty space most of the time – except in the weeks leading up to Christmas when a pre-fabricated wall, about half the height of the glass pictured, would be carried into place, the old door and padlock having managed to make it through another year.  Behind that wobbly wall and padlock were dozens of Christmas trees which Dad, and other men of the congregation, would sell, in the cold and damp, after a hard day’s work.  I accompanied Dad many times and I can almost recall with bodily memories the painful numbness in my feet as we sought brief shelter in the building proper from time to time.

This was Valleyfield United Church in Salaberry-de-Valleyfield, Québec where, when not at home, I spent a great deal of time in my youth.  The congregation left the building many years ago and since then it has been kept on life support by, among other things, a small French-language fundamentalist congregation.  Oy!

Mom was the organist for 30 years, and a mighty fine one at that, as well as the choir director which – oh well – she did what she could with whom she had to work!  The two manual pipe organ was built by the well-known Canadian firm Casavant Frères of Ste-Hyacinthe.  Serendipitously, the company is still going strong and bought the organ back to be installed elsewhere.

Built across the street from the 19th-century Montreal Cotton mill, using the same stone, the church first served Scottish Presbyterian settlers who, having named Valleyfield for a town in Scotland, put their stone masonry expertise to good use and harnessed the power of the St. Charles River which cut through the island in the St. Lawrence and which the massive cotton mill complex was built around.  When the mill was demolished in the 1970s, sending a smaller work-force out to a modern, suburban plant (which has also since closed) it was a big blow to Valleyfield’s already small English-speaking community.  In addition to political turmoil which sent many English-speaking families packing, rightly or wrongly, the changes in industry had a major impact on what was essentially a factory town – textiles, Goodyear tires, munitions, chemicals, the harbour and, oh yes, a huge Schenley’s distillery!

This beautiful building will fare better than the neighbouring Presbyterian church which, last I heard, is now an indoor rock-climbing centre!  The architect’s drawing (top) was done for MUSO, Musée de société des Deux-Rives, – (loosely translated as Museum of the People of the Two Shores) – is it any wonder “MUSO” has caught on as its name?

It is a museum which has been without a home, limited to travelling exhibits, in addition to its very well-developed web site (which will be moving eventually to a new domain).

MUSO’s directors are taking great steps to ensure that as much of the former church is preserved, including exceptionally beautiful stained-glass windows which completely surround the sanctuary.  I’m drawing on an admittedly greying memory but, other than an abstract one which is beautiful shades of rose,  high above where the organ used to be, the windows all depict scenes from biblical stories – Jesus as shepherd, the road to Damascus and I guess half a dozen others including the last one installed, the only one dedicated in my life-time, which depicts the nativity scene.  These windows are another reason, in addition to the practical use of solar power, for the new glass area.  This will allow eastern sunlight to continue to show windows so situated.

Considering this is a building which was foundational, in the best possible ways, to my youth (better than many children’s experiences elsewhere) I am delighted that it will live on in the form of this exciting museum.

I very much look forward to visiting after it has opened next year!

Map picture

photo Massicotte et Dignard architectes Crédit-photo: Massicotte et Dignard

Cet atrium de verre entre l’église sur la gauche et la salle sociaux sur le droit a été, jusqu’à début des travaux, un espace vide la plupart du temps – sauf dans les semaines précédant Noël, quand un mur pré-fabriqués, à environ la moitié de la hauteur de le verre sur la photo, serait effectué en place, la vieille porte et un cadenas avoir réussi à le faire à travers une autre année. Derrière ce mur bancal et cadenas étaient des dizaines d’arbres de Noël que Papa, et d’autres hommes de la congrégation, serait de vendre, dans le froid et humide, après une dure journée de travail. J’ai accompagné plusieurs fois papa et je peux presque rappeler des souvenirs corporelles de l’engourdissement douloureux dans les pieds que nous avons cherché un abri dans le bâtiment brève bon de temps en temps.

Ce fut l’Église Unie de Valleyfield à Salaberry-de-Valleyfield, où j’ai passé beaucoup de temps dans ma jeunesse. La congrégation a quitté le bâtiment il ya plusieurs années et depuis lors il a été maintenu en vie par, entre autres, une petite congrégation intégriste. Oy!

Maman a été l’organiste pendant 30 ans, et une fort belle à cela, ainsi que le directeur de la chorale qui – eh bien – elle faisait ce qu’elle pouvait avec qui elle avait à travailler! L’orgue à deux tuyaux d’emploi a été construit par le célèbre firme Casavant Frères de Ste-Hyacinthe. Par un heureux hasard, l’entreprise est toujours aussi fort et les props. ont acheté l’organe de retour doit être installé ailleurs.

Construit en face du moulin du 19e siècle Montreal Cotton, en utilisant la même pierre, la première église presbytérienne servi colons écossais qui, après avoir nommé Valleyfield pour une ville d’Ecosse, mettent leur expertise en maçonnerie de pierre à la bonne utilisation et exploité la puissance du rivière Saint-Charles qui traversent l’île dans le Saint-Laurent et autour qui le complexe coton massive moulin a été construit. Lorsque l’usine a été démolie dans les années 1970, l’envoi d’une petite force de travail vers une usine moderne de banlieue (qui a également fermé depuis), il a été un coup dur pour Valleyfield communauté anglophone déjà faible. En plus de l’agitation politique qui a envoyé de nombreux emballage familles anglophones, tort ou à raison, les changements dans l’industrie a eu un impact majeur sur ce qui était essentiellement une ville d’usine – textiles, les pneus Goodyear, munitions, produits chimiques, le port etc., et, oh oui, une distillerie Schenley énorme!

Ce magnifique bâtiment sera mieux que l’église presbytérienne voisins qui, la dernière que j’ai entendu, est maintenant un centre d’escalade intérieure! dessin de l’architecte (en haut) a été fait pour MUSO, Musée de société des Deux-Rives, il est pas étonnant “muso” a pris en tant que son nom?

C’est un musée qui a été sans domicile, limité à des expositions itinérantes, en plus de son site web très bien développé (qui se déplacera finalement à un nouveau domaine).

Les administrateurs de MUSO sont de prendre des mesures considérables pour s’assurer que le plus de l’ancienne église est conservée, y compris d’une beauté exceptionnelle de vitraux qui entourent complètement le sanctuaire. Je suis en s’appuyant sur une mémoire certes, mais grisonnant, autre qu’un un résumé qui est de belles nuances de rose, au-dessus de l’organe où l’habitude d’être, les fenêtres représentent des scènes de tous les récits bibliques – Jésus comme berger, le chemin de Damas et je suppose une demi-douzaine d’autres, dont le dernier est installé, le seul dédié à ma vie à temps, ce qui représente la scène de la nativité. Ces fenêtres sont une autre raison, en plus de l’utilisation pratique de l’énergie solaire, pour la région de verre neuf. Cela permettra à la lumière du soleil est de continuer à afficher les fenêtres afin situé.

Considérant ceci est un bâtiment qui a été fondamental, de la meilleure façon possible, à ma jeunesse (mieux que les expériences de nombreux enfants d’ailleurs) je suis très heureux qu’il continuera à vivre dans la forme de ce musée passionnant.

Je suis très impatient de me rendre après qu’il a ouvert l’année prochaine!