Susan Mabey to receive 2017 Craig Chaplin Memorial Award


“A Christian who happens to be a lesbian”, Susan Mabey’s is a name which has been more than incidental in the long struggle for LGBT inclusion in the United Church of Canada.  Cited by the Chaplin Award committee for her recent bridge building, even as a self-described ‘lightning rod’, while the multi-ethnic Toronto school, where she teaches Grade 2, struggled with the new provincially-mandated health and sex education program, Susan drew national attention of a different kind in the early 1980s when she was refused ordination in the United Church of Canada due to her sexual orientation. (She very quickly established herself as a minister of Christos Metropolitan Community Church in Toronto at a time when the largely-LGBT congregation was beginning to be devastated by AIDS illness and deaths.)

Susan’s 1999 Doctor of Ministry thesis was entitled “When the Valley of the Shadow is Littered with Bones: Ministry in the Midst of Multiple Bereavements”.

See Shower of Stoles Project

The Craig Chaplin Memorial Award was established following the death of my brother in 2007. It is meant to lift up the outstanding vocation of an openly lgbtq person. Susan will be presented with the award as part of the Convocation of United Theological College, in Montreal this May, the tenth anniversary of Craig’s death.

“UTC is honoured to name Rev. Mabey’s long and courageous commitment to justice and inclusion, compassion and vital pastoral presence, and in particular, to the ministry she now lives as a teacher.”

Rev. James Scott will be recognized through the conferring of the degree Doctor of Divinity (honoris causa).  Rev. Scott, the United Church of Canada’s General Council Officer for Residential Schools, will also be the convocation speaker.  The College “recognizes in particular Rev. Scott’s profound commitment to indigenous concerns and his work with the Church in preparation for, and response to, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.”

UTC’s convocation exercises will be held at Roxboro United Church, 116, rue Cartier in Roxboro, Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 2 pm.  Roxboro, which will officially become an Affirming Congregation of the United Church of Canada on May 7, is the congregation of Rev. Darryl Macdonald who, in 2009, was the second recipient of the Chaplin Award.

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Celebrating Craig and a walk (now with map) from Le Plâteau to Outremont and back (Montréal)


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Mom and I arrived at Claude’s on Monday for the second annual presentation Wednesday of the Craig Chaplin Memorial Award to Darryl Macdonald. It was a wonderful convocation ceremony and service, and it was terrific to meet Darryl and his husband Chris (r).

Now Craig’s dream has been realized twice, with many more such occasions to come provided the fund remains viable. With convocation – and the further conferring of this award – likely to forever coincide (almost) with the anniversary of Craig’s death, May 9, it is almost as if Craig would be saying, “No time to be weepy; get on with life (and keep those donations coming)!”

I already have a pretty good idea who next year’s award recipient will be. Right from the start there has been no shortage of great candidates.

With Craig’s wishes so explicit, “To recognize the powerful and passionate ministries of gay and lesbian persons and to honour one whose life’s work has been particularly distinguished in its clear commitment to such central Gospel values as personal courage and integrity, life-affirming faith and spirituality, an unswerving commitment to social justice, a sustainable environment and solidarity with those who are poor or marginalized“, I am very proud that UTC publicly, prophetically, stands out among United Church of Canada colleges – not to mention any other schools of religious training – in living out its commitment to ensure the equal ministries of LGBT people.

Tuesday I took a long walk from the southeastern-most corner of Le Plâteau neighbourhood to Outremont to the northwest, and then past Mordecai Richler‘s old haunts to rue Gilford and on to Parc Lafontaine before going back to Claude’s.

Did I take pictures!